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by Wendy Stackhouse · February 25, 2013

The Aftermath of Trauma

bloody brick wall

You never want to be one of those people on the news--victims of crime or the residents of the scene of a crime or trauma. It's bad enough being involved in a situation like that, but after the camera crews and the CSI teams go back to the office, your challenges are only beginning. The emotional fallout from crimes and trauma cannot be minimized, but they are not the only thing people have to deal with after the frenzy is over.

There is still the mess.

You might be tempted to sign anything to get rid of the evidence of a crime or a trauma in your home, but a reputable company will not take advantage of your emotional state.

Crime and Trauma Scene Cleanup

Crime and Trauma scenes involve all sorts of hazardous materials, both biological and chemical, not to mention other nasty substances that make ordinary people run for the hills. Or at least the bushes!

Cleanup teams are well-protected--they wear one-time-use hazardous material suits, respirators, gloves and chemical spill boots. They use ordinary cleaning supplies like mops, sponges, buckets and spray bottles, but professional clean up crews also bring a lot of specialized equipment:

  • Ozone machines to remove odors
  • Foggers—cleaning chemicals have to reach all the way down into air ducts to get rid of bad smells, too
  • Industrial strength disinfectants and deodorizers
  • Enzyme solvents to eliminate viruses and bacteria, as well as liquefy dried blood!
  • Razor blades to remove portions of carpeting

...and more. They also bring a truck to transport all of the hazardous waste, ladders so they can reach every bit of the scene, supplies for doing reconstruction and photography equipment for taking before and after pictures for insurance claims.

Rather than adding to the trauma of losing a loved on or having a crime committed on your property, however, your cleanup crew should make dealing with the aftermath easier emotionally and not make it worse by charging people who are already in shock exorbitant amounts of money.

We read in the news about a company in Maryland charging huge fees for trauma and crime scene cleanup projects. The victims in these cases were required to sign documents called "mechanics liens" which required them to pay whatever the charges would be and then overcharged, in our opinion as much as double a reasonable rate.

No ethical company would take advantage of grief-stricken people in this way.

We want you to know that, although we hope you never need our crime or trauma scene cleanup services, if you do, we hold ourselves to a high ethical standard and would never take advantage of people under stress. We will always be professional and our standing in our industry and with the Better Business Bureau is there to prove it.

Alliance Environmental Group has been doing crime and trauma scene cleanup projects a lot lately and you can read about them on our blog. We hope you have confidence in us if we are ever needed.

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