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by Wendy Stackhouse · June 12, 2013

Allergens Lurking in Your Home

Pots on a Ledge Image by Greenbay via stock.xchng

Since our blog at AirTek yesterday had some good information about some of Alliance's environmental issues, it's a good time for a cross-post!

You might feel like your allergies are going to be worse outside. If newly mowed grass or pollen are your main culprits, you might be right. But if you have allergies all the time, you might want to think about some places in your home that could be triggering your symptoms:

Plants–We’ve told you on the AirTek blog about plants that can help to remove harmful chemicals in your indoor air and we don’t want you to get rid of that spider plant just yet. But mold can grow on pots in saucers. Inspect your plants once a week for mold.

Pets–It’s probably not the fur, it’s more likely to be the dander–dead skin cells–from your pet that set you off. Wash your pet’s bedding often and consider not letting them sleep in your bed or on the couch if you have allergies. Man’s best friend may not be best friends with your allergies.

Carpeting, Rugs and Upholstery–All of these textiles can be harboring dust mites, tiny bugs which feed on the dead skin cells from your body. If your allergies are severe, you might want to consider changing to hardwood floors, but a vacuum with a HEPA filter can help, too.

Books–Do you sneeze when you open an book you haven’t looked at for a while? Before switching to an e-reader (although they are great), consider vacuuming your bookshelves or storing your books in closed containers.

Air Conditioners–Ideally your air conditioner should help improve your indoor air. Change the filter often and make sure your air conditioner is not staying wet with condensation, anywhere there is water there can be mold and spores getting into your air.

In today’s well-sealed homes, when particles, pollution, chemicals and mold spores get in, they have trouble getting out. Be sure to keep your ventilation system clean and well-maintained so your indoor air isn’t worse than the air outside!

Wendy Stackhouse is the Online Community Manager for Alliance Environmental Group and AirTek Indoor Air Solutions. We welcome your comments! For more news and tips or to ask questions of our experts, Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter! For updates on indoor air challenges, Like us at AirTek on Facebook!

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